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Custom Replacement Windows


That Really Work, At An Affordable Price!
Morrison’s Home Improvement Specialist Inc. is a residential remodeling contractor in Berkshire County. We provide high-end interior and exterior renovations for houses, condos, apartments and mobile homes in Pittsfield, Lenox, Great Barrington, and throughout Berkshire County. Our quality service, vast experience, and reasonable pricing has earned us a reputation we honor.
We have been a top replacement windows contractor in Berkshire county for over twenty years. Our reputation says it all, and our products speak for themselves. Whether you’re building a new home or planning to replace existing windows we have products to meet your needs at any budget.
WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD!
GET YOUR BEST PRICE, THEN COME SEE US. WE WILL MEET OR BEAT FOR COMPARABLE MATERIALS.

IN NEED OF SOME WINDOWS?

A list from our Experts on what to look for when deciding on windows for your home

  • The Frame – A variety of materials are available for window frames, and each has positive and negative aspects. Here’s a look:

    • Vinyl: A well-constructed, properly installed vinyl window can be a practical choice budgetwise while still offering excellent energy efficiency measures through insulated glass and tight construction that reduces air leakage.

    • Wood: These windows offer the best insulative value, though they also require more upkeep than vinyl, wood-clad or aluminum frames. Because of the potential for rot, they may not be the best choice for extremely humid or rainy climates.

    • Aluminum: While not the top-performing material in terms of heat transfer and loss, aluminum windows are practical in rainy, humid climates, and they meet stringent coastal building codes in hurricane-prone areas thanks to their strength.

    • Wood-clad: Wood-clad windows seemingly offer the best of both worlds: a low-maintenance exterior (usually vinyl or aluminum) and a temperature-transfer-resistant wood interior. But clad windows can be prone to water intrusion, which can cause rotting, especially in the sills and jambs, where water tends to pool.

    • Composite: These windows, made from scrap wood shavings and plastic resins, can effectively mimic the look of wood but are virtually maintenance-free. And because the resins used in the window-manufacturing process are often from recycled plastics, they’re an eco-friendly choice.

    • Fiberglass: Fiberglass windows are more expensive than other similarly equipped window units, but their selling points are many: They’re extremely energy efficient thanks to their low thermal conductivity; they’re the strongest and most durable windows on the market; unlike vinyl windows, they can be repainted several times; and they don’t twist or warp like vinyl or wood frames can.

  • The Glass-While the material each window is constructed from is important, the reality is that most important part concerning energy efficiency deals with the glass itself. To qualify for Energy Star status, window manufacturers must meet standards for these two main metrics:

    • U-value, which measures a window unit’s resistance to heat loss

    • Solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), which measures how much heat enters a home through the glass

    *For both U-value and SHGC, the lower the number, the better the window will perform.
  • The Design- Who said functionality and efficiency had to mean a sacrifice in style?! Some window designs are inherently more efficient than others. The most common types are:
  • The Installation- Even the most expensive window unit won’t perform effectively if it’s not installed correctly. Flashing and proper caulking may be the cheapest parts of window installation, but if they’re not done with an eye to detail, the ensuing water leaks will cause a barrage of problems for both builder and buyer that could have been easily prevented.

    • Double-hung windows. These are traditional units in many homes across the country, and they’re especially common in prewar buildings. With double-hung windows, the bottom slides up to open the unit. They can be efficient choices, but in extreme climates, they may not be the best option, because of the potential for air intrusion between the sliders.

    • Casement windows. Popular in climates where wind is an issue, these units, which have a crank that swings the window outward to open, actually seal themselves off tighter when wind blows toward the house. They require maintenance on hinges and seals, however, to ensure their continued stability and efficiency.

    • Picture windows. These usually don’t open, and they come in many shapes and sizes, but that doesn’t mean they can’t be efficient — glass choice and gas-filled interiors are especially important with these larger units.

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